S2 E15: Speak Chuckaboo!

Welcome to my Reading Room! Let’s talk about books!

Speak Chuckaboo, Slang of the Victorian and Steam Eras, by Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene arrived at my doorstep a few days ago.   I knew that my sister, Sarah, would be very interested in this book and waited impatiently for our meeting on the Saturday following the delivery of Teagan’s book.

Sarah and I have designated Saturdays as our “Book Day” – a special time when we talk about the books that we are currently reading.

Please join Sarah and me as we explore Speak Chuckaboo and and the words of Victorian and Steam Eras.

Click on the photo and below for a preview of Speak Chuckaboo.


Speak Chuckaboo, Slang of the Victorian and Steam Eras by Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene

The Blurb on the back of the Book


Back in the days of steam engines and mannerly people, a chuckaboo was one’s dear friend. This volume contains slang from the Victorian Era, as well as the Steam Era, which began before the reign of Queen Victoria, and continued into the early 1900s. It combines language from the Victorian, Edwardian, and Steam Eras because there was a great deal of overlap.

This slang dictionary also contains a sprinkling of vocabulary words of those eras, which have fallen out of use, along with some history and trivia.

While every effort was made to be as historically accurate as possible, this compilation is not meant to be a scholarly work. It is intended for fictional use and entertainment purposes.

Have fun speaking chuckaboo. You’re positively rum ti tum with the chill off! Simply hunky dory.

Thank you for Joining Sarah & me to discuss Speak Chuckaboo by Teagan Geneviene

Annunciation by Helen Hoyt Rebecca's Reading Room

Speak Chuckaboo, Slang of the Victorian and Steam Eras by Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene

Published by Rebecca Budd

Blogger, Visual Storyteller, Podcaster, Traveler and Life-long Learner

67 thoughts on “S2 E15: Speak Chuckaboo!

  1. It’s all beer and skittles, watching you two ladies together. I’m thrilled that you both enjoyed Speak Chuckaboo! And then you threw in shout-outs for Speak Flapper and Dead of Winter. I’m overjoyed. It was like hanging out with you both, watching the video. Hugs on the wing!

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    1. Sarah and I loved meeting up with you on Speak Chuckaboo, Teagan. I have this book in paperback and Kindle versions. I have Flapper Speak in Kindle version, so decided that I must have a paperback copy to go along with my Speak Chuckaboo paperback. That way, Frances, my mother will be able to enjoy it too. I have a feeling that she may know many of these words. Hugs coming back on the wing.

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  2. That was so fun, Rebecca. I loved watching you and Sarah get excited about Teagan’s book, especially when you started reading some of the phrases. A wonderful book from Teagan that sounds like a great resource as well as an entertaining read for anyone who loves language. Congrats to Teagan. 🙂

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    1. I had been looking forward to Speak Chuckaboo ever since I heard that she was putting another book of definitions together. Speak Flapper was amazing, so I knew that this book would be a delight. How she came to know these words and definitions is a mystery. “Smart as a steel trap” is in the book which means “someone who is particularly intelligent and quick. Teagan fits that definition.

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      1. Ha! You are far too kind, Rebecca.
        I didn’t painstakingly cite the sources, particularly since I often found the same phrases at multiple sources. That’s why I state upfront that “This is not a scholarly work.” I also felt that kind of formatting would take away from the fun of the book.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for joining us in celebrating the words of a past time, Jacquie. I am meeting up with my mother Frances, tomorrow, who is 91, to see how many words she remembers. My father used “hornswoggle” as in “I’ve been hornswoggled”- or I have been fooled. I am having so much fun going through the definitions.

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    1. I agree, Mandy. Teagan has a brilliant creativity that comes out in her writing. Here is another definition that would apply to our rainforest environment: “Brolly: An umbrella, circa 1873)”. Many thanks for listening in to Sarah and my conversation in nature. Sarah asked me yesterday if we would going to be talking about books in nature during the Winter. We agreed that it would be a perfect setting to discuss “Dead of Winter.”

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  3. Thanks so much for introducing this book. It’s definitely got my name on it. Thanks for playing to the gallery (You’re not of course – not showing off at all, just being interesting). This phrase is still in common use here.

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    1. Thank you so much for joining the conversation, Margaret. Isn’t it interesting how sayings and phrases have an enduring quality. My grandmother always told me to have patience with this saying “Hold you horses.” I had no idea what she was talking about until much later. But even now, I use that saying…

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      1. I agree, Margaret. One of my most memorable high school teachers was my literature teacher who immigrated from Britain. The first class we had was on the difference to language between Britain and Canada. And then he gave us great examples. He said that even though we speak the same language, words have different meanings. I have never forgotten that class.

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  4. I am so glad you featured Teagan’s book, Rebecca. I have both of her slang dictionaries, and I enjoyed reading both, very much. I love language, and Teagan uses language in her books and stories, so well. I think the only thing that can Teagan’s book better is watching you and your sister, exploring this book.

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  5. Hi Rebecca and Sarah, what a lovely discussion about this book of Teagan’s. It sounds very entertaining. I have just finished Journey 12 of Teagan’s book and have Journey’s 13 and 14 coming up to finish the series. I also notice that I am way off with my pronunciation of Teagan’s surname, but I also know that when I do my next live book review and reading from one of Teagan’s books, I will have completely forgotten how you said it.

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      1. Rebecca’s Reading Room has been around about a couple of years. It is my personal exploration/progress into poetry recitation. It is also a way to look back into public domain poetry. The podcasts are very short. I also wanted to explore how Anchor/Spotify is moving from audio to video format. Blogging is evolving rapidly. You are very very busy, Robbie, so please don’t feel you need to follow or keep up. Sending many thanks for your support and encouragement.

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      2. I like the short reviews, Rebecca. I believe more people would leave reviews at Amazon and/or Goodreads if they realized that a short review, or even a couple of positive sentences were the life blood of authors. Thank you again for this wonderful video review.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. It would be fabulous if you can. I’ve tried to upload my book trailers to my author page, but they are too long. However, I have not tried to add a video to a customer review, so I don’t know if length is an issue or not.
        Thank you for putting reviews on Amazon. They really are the lifeblood for authors. ❤

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Robbie. Heartfelt thanks for being part of the Journeys of “Dead of Winter.” I hope you love the rest of the series, whenever you get to it.
      Oh, my problematic name… names… all three are a pronunciation nightmare. As long as you don’t saw Gwenivere (which some people do… beats me how) you’re fine. LOL.
      Rebecca’s French pronunciation of Geneviene is one correct way.
      My name is from Scottish Gaelic. I usually pronounce it Gen-eh-VEEN. But accenting the first syllable is probably more correct.
      https://www.howtopronounce.com/geneviene
      But when people stumble on it, or otherwise look like they might be about to say Gwenivere… I sometimes use a French-like pronunciation Gen-eh-vee-EN… mostly because that way they simply stop and don’t try to say anything at all. LOL 😀
      Thanks for joining this group of “lotties & totties” for a little fandango, my chuckaboo!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Hi Teagan, you can always count on me to go syllabic if I don’t know how to pronounce a name. Thanks for the information on your surname and how to pronounce it. People get my married name of Cheadle very wrong too. They also get Roberta wrong which is why I use Robbie. This book sounds terrific. Have a great day.

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    2. I love your love book reviews, Robbie and will be on the look out for the live book review of Teagan’s books (You have a marvelous YouTube channel). I am fascinated by the depth and breadth of Dead of Winter.

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      1. You’re so kind, Robbie. I don’t know about Rebecca’s but my blog (in the setup that I call the “guts” of it) has a setting where the number of comments in a “thread” can be limited. However, when I go to a post via the Reader, that limit doesn’t seem to apply. 🙂

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  6. Wonderful, Rebecca and Sarah. I love this! I am a fan of Teagan and her stories, and I got this book already. After listening to you talking about it and having such fun, I know where to go for some laughs and to learn plenty about the language of the era as well. Thanks for sharing those, congratulations to Teagan, and I look forward to your conversation on Dead of Winter, which I enjoyed so much.

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    1. Sarah and I had fun discussing Teagan’s book, Speak Chuckaboo. There is so much information and trivia (you know how much I love trivia) packed in this volume. I remember my grandmother saying “sakes alive”. Isn’t is interesting how words evolve over time.

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      1. We are learning to make this videos as we go along, Liz. We laughed when we viewed the video and found that I placed the book in front of Sarah’s face, rather than in between us. And then, in the first take I said that my name was Sarah. I should really have videos of bloopers. As you say, these audio/videos have more than 1 takes.

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